Giant sequoia tree found still smoking from 2020 California wildfire

“The fact areas are still smoldering and smoking from the 2020 Castle Fire demonstrates how dry the park is,” said Leif Mathiesen, assistant fire management officer for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in central California. “With the low amount of snowfall and rain this year, there may be additional discoveries as spring transitions into summer.”

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The smoldering tree was found recently by scientists and fire crews surveying the effects of the blaze, which was ignited by lightning last August and spread over more than 270 square miles (699 square kilometers) of the Sierra Nevada. It took five months to fully contain.

Most of California is deep in drought, with severe to extreme conditions in the mountain range that provides about a third of the state’s water. On April 1, when the Sierra Nevada snowpack is normally at its peak, its water content was just 59% of average, according to the state Department of Water Resources.

This photo provided by the National Park Service shows what appears to be a smoldering tree in Sequoia National Park, Calif., on April 22, 2021. A giant sequoia has been found smoldering and smoking in an area of Sequoia National Park burned by one of the huge wildfires that scorched California last year. The National Park Service said Wednesday, May 5, 2021, that the cause of the tree fire appears to be the 2020 Castle Fire, which burned more than 270 square miles in the Sierra Nevada. (Tony Caprio/National Park Service via AP)

This photo provided by the National Park Service shows what appears to be a smoldering tree in Sequoia National Park, Calif., on April 22, 2021. A giant sequoia has been found smoldering and smoking in an area of Sequoia National Park burned by one of the huge wildfires that scorched California last year. The National Park Service said Wednesday, May 5, 2021, that the cause of the tree fire appears to be the 2020 Castle Fire, which burned more than 270 square miles in the Sierra Nevada. (Tony Caprio/National Park Service via AP)

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