Guatemalan president says he's had no direct contact with White House since border czar Harris' June meeting

Giammattei said that there is “much to be done” to fix the migration crisis affecting both nations, as Guatemalans flee, often illegally, into the United States.

On Harris’ stated focus on “root causes” of migration in Central America, Giammattei suggested on “America Reports” that the crisis is not a single-faceted issue.

“First of all, migration can’t be stopped on the basis of circumstantial causes. It needs to be stopped on the basis of structural causes,” he said, pointing to the drug cartels that are largely in Mexico who also smuggle Guatemalans and other humans into the U.S.

“It’s a big business to run trafficking-person schemes. It’s a $ 4 billion business for these criminals. And therefore we need to address structural causes,” Giammattei added.

Giammattei recalled telling Harris that as a former prosecutor in California, she likely understands the U.S. criminal code can be strengthened to better eradicate the problems.

Migrants who aim to reach the U.S. walk along a highway as they leave San Pedro Sula, Honduras before dawn Tuesday. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

Migrants who aim to reach the U.S. walk along a highway as they leave San Pedro Sula, Honduras before dawn Tuesday. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

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