Massie: CDC's entire leadership must be fired over coronavirus 'lies'

“If the government response to this virus has taught us anything, it’s that everyone at the top of @CDCgov needs to be fired. It’s being far too generous to characterize their constant stream of lies as ‘misinterpretations’ and ‘typos,’” Massie wrote on Twitter on Tuesday.

Massie linked to a March op-ed from four medical researchers criticizing the CDC for its school reopening guidelines.

“Keeping schools closed or even partially closed, based on what we know now is unwarranted, is harming children, and has become a human rights issue,” they wrote earlier this year in an article claiming the CDC misinterpreted their research.

CORONAVIRUS TESTING RETAINS IN-PERSON CLASSES, EXTRACURRICULARS: CDC STUDY

Last month, a New York Times report claimed that the CDC’s estimate that the risk of coronavirus transmission while outdoors is around 10% is greatly exaggerated. The CDC had cited the 10% estimate to back up its recommendation that vaccinated individuals do away with masks in certain outdoor situations, but should keep wearing masks during others. 

According to the Times, the 10% benchmark is based “partly on a misclassification” of some virus transmission in Singapore at various construction sites that may have actually taken place in indoor settings. Singapore also classified settings that were a mix of indoors and outdoors as outdoors, including construction building sites, the outlet reported. The number of cases reported at the various sites did not add up to as much as 10% of transmission but was more like 1% or less, the report stated.

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., stops to speak with reporters as he leaves the Capitol after the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act was passed in the House on Friday, March 27, 2020. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., stops to speak with reporters as he leaves the Capitol after the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act was passed in the House on Friday, March 27, 2020. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

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