NASA studies Louisiana delta system in effort to combat global climate change

NASA is using high-tech airborne systems along with boats and mud-slogging work on islands for a $ 15 milioni, five-year study of these adjacent areas of Louisiana. One is hitched to a river and growing; the other is disconnected and dying.

Scientists from NASA and a half-dozen universities a partire dal Boston per California aim to create computer models that can be used with satellite data to let countries around the world learn which parts of their dwindling deltas can be shored up and which are past hope.

NASA ADMINISTRATOR BILL NELSON BELIEVES WE ARE NOT ALONE IN THE UNIVERSE

If you have to choose between saving an area and losing another instead of losing everything, you want to know where to put your resources to work to save the livelihood of all the people who live there,” said lead scientist Marc Simard of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Mentre oceans rise because of climate change, il world’s fiume deltas — home to seafood nurseries and more than 300 un milione di persone — siamo sinking and shrinking.

To figure out where to shore up dying deltas, NASA is studying water flowing in and out of Louisiana’s Atchafalaya and Terrebonne basins, sediment carried by it, and plants that can slow the flow, trap sediment and pull carbon from the air.

Hog Bayou, part of the Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin, is seen from a plane in St. Mary Parish, Il., martedì, Maggio 25, 2021. In geological time, young means thousands of years. On that scale, Louisiana's Wax Lake Delta is taking its first breaths. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Hog Bayou, part of the Wax Lake Delta in the Atchafalaya Basin, is seen from a plane in St. Mary Parish, Il., martedì, Maggio 25, 2021. In geological time, young means thousands of years. On that scale, Louisiana’s Wax Lake Delta is taking its first breaths. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

I commenti sono chiusi.