Nashville bomber feared 5G conspiracies, hunted aliens, believed in ‘lizard people’: rapporto

Nashville bomber feared 5G conspiracies, hunted aliens, believed in ‘lizard people’: rapporto

The man suspected of detonating an RV bomb in Nashville on Christmas morning may have followed a number of conspiracy theories, believed inlizard people” — and spent time hunting for aliens, secondo un nuovo rapporto.

Anthony Quinn Warner, 63, also may have feared that 5G technology was a threat to health and liberty, law enforcement sources told ABC News.

The unnamed sources reportedly found conspiracy-minded writings authored by Warner, and investigators were looking into whether his beliefs had anything to do with the explosion.

Questa immagine non datata pubblicata sui social media dall

Questa immagine non datata pubblicata sui social media dall'FBI mostra Anthony Quinn Warner. Ammonitore, the man accused of planting a bomb in Nashville, Tenn., il giorno di Natale, told a neighbor days earlier thatNashville and the world is never going to forget me.” (Per gentile concessione dell'FBI tramite AP)

Warner blew up an RV parked in downtown Nashville around 6:30 a.m. on Christmas, damaging dozens of buildings, killing himself and injuring three others. The blast also damaged an AT&T facility and led to service outages in and around the region. A&T’s wireless network includes 5G service across the country, and investigators were looking into whether the building had been targeted.

NASHVILLE BOMBER TOLD NEIGHBOR WORLD ‘NEVER GOING TO FORGET ME

The lizard people conspiracy, popularized by controversial British writer David Icke e altri, posits that shapeshifting alien reptiles can assume human form in a bid to take over the world.

Icke was banned from Twitter last month after allegedly spreading COVID-19disinformationand attacking Dr. Anthony Fauci, il BBC segnalato. He had already been banned from Facebook and YouTube, and also embraced 5G conspiracies.

NASHVILLE BOMBING SUSPECT ANTHONY QUINN WARNER DIED IN EXPLOSION, POLICE CONFIRM

Authorities have not released a motive for the bombing, but Warner showed some odd behavior before the blast.

He gave away his car, saying he had cancer. He transferred the deed to his house for free. And he told his employer that he was retiring.

Law enforcement seized some of his belongings during their investigation, including a computer and storage drive.

CLICCA QUI PER OTTENERE L'APP FOX NEWS

His only arrest came in 1978 on a marijuana charge.

L'Associated Press ha contribuito a questo rapporto.

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