NYPD retiree says officers are 'fed up,' leaving in droves for 'greener pastures' over woke policies

Jason Caputo joined “Fox & Friends First” to discuss the impact of the “woke” policies on the police force, and why many are even sacrificing their pensions.

“I have actually seen other people also go to other departments who have they just got trained by the NYPD have left for greener pastures for more money or just not this type of government that doesn’t back you at all,” Caputo told co-host Ashley Strohmier. 

NEW YORK CITY DOESN’T DESERVE NYPD, THE FINEST POLICE IN THE WORLD

“People are just fed up with this job, actually,” he continued. “The more you talk to people in the office, the more you talk to the cops, they’re like this job is not what I thought it was going to be. Guys in my position… this is not the job I joined. When I was a cop, when it came on, we were out there. We were doing our job… Our bosses backed us, our city backed us, the state backed us. Now, it’s not like that.”

NYPD officers respond to the scene of a shooting that left multiple people injured in the Flatbush neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough on April 06, 2021 in New York City. 

NYPD officers respond to the scene of a shooting that left multiple people injured in the Flatbush neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough on April 06, 2021 in New York City.  (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

According to NYPD pension fund data, there were 1,236 officers that retired in 2020, and 1,064 in 2021. 

In 2022 so far, there have already been 1,472 officers who have retired. 

“In the last couple of years I see that it’s more of an off-hands approach to policing,” Caputo said. “Police officers are actually unwilling to actually put their hands on people because they know the risks not only of their career, their future, their family, for that matter, too, because you could be sued at any moment and the job won’t actually back you if they have any inkling of that, you did one thing wrong.”

“So you’re going to have a whole bunch of police officers that don’t want to put their hands on people or actually, in effect, interact,” he continued. “They put themselves in danger as well as the public.”

Violent crime has been on the rise in a variety of cities this year, with several on track to outpace last year’s bloody statistics. New York City has seen a surge of 25.8% so far in 2022. 

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