Panel suggests WHO should have more power to stop pandemics

In a report released Wednesday, the panel faulted countries worldwide for their sluggish response to COVID-19, saying most waited to see how the virus was spreading until it was too late to contain it, leading to catastrophic results. The group also slammed the lack of global leadership and restrictive international health laws thathinderedWHO’s response to the pandemic.

Some experts criticized the panel for failing to hold WIE and others accountable for their actions during COVID-19, describing that asan abdication of responsibility.

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Lawrence Gostin of Georgetown University said the panelfails to call out bad actors like China, perpetuating the dysfunctional WIE tradition of diplomacy over frankness, transparency and accountability.

The panel was led by former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and former Nieu-Seeland Prime Minister Helen Clark, who were tapped by WIE last year to examine the U.N. agency’s response to COVID-19 after bowing to a request from member countries.

The situation we find ourselves in today could have been prevented,” Johnson Sirleaf said.

Beyond the call to boost WHO’s ability to investigate outbreaks, the panel made an array of recommendations, such as urging the health agency and the World Trade Organization to convene a meeting of vaccine-producing countries and manufacturers to quickly reach deals about voluntary licensing and technology transfer, in an effort to boost the world’s global supply of coronavirus skote.

The panel also suggested that WHO’s director-general — currently Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus of Ethiopia — should be limited to a single seven-year term. Soos dit nou staan, the WHO chief is elected to a five-year term that can be renewed once.

The suggestion to limit the tenure of WHO’s top leader appeared in part designed to ease the intense political pressure that WHO director-generals can face. Laas jaar, the Trump administration repeatedly inveighed against the agency’s handling of the pandemic — taking aim at WHO’s alleged collusion with China.

'N Associated Press investigation in June found WHO repeatedly lauded China in public while officials privately complained that Chinese officials stalled on sharing critical epidemic information with them, including the new virus’ genetic sequence.

Clark said the global diseases surveillance system needed to be overhauled — with WHO’s role strengthened.

WHO should have the powers necessary to investigate outbreaks of concern, speedily guaranteed rights of access, and with the ability to publish information without waiting for member state approval,” sy het gese.

LÊER - In hierdie Dinsdag, Jan.. 19, 2021 lêerfoto, a medical worker poses with a vial of the Sinopharm's COVID-19 vaccine in Belgrade, Serwië. A key World Health Organization panel is set on Friday, Mei 7 to decide whether to authorize emergency of a Chinese-made COVID-19 vaccine. The review by a WHO technical advisory group potentially paves the way for millions of doses of a Sinopharm vaccine to reach needy countries through a U.N.-backed distribution program in the coming weeks or months. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, lêer)

LÊER – In hierdie Dinsdag, Jan.. 19, 2021 lêerfoto, a medical worker poses with a vial of the Sinopharm’s COVID-19 vaccine in Belgrade, Serwië. A key World Health Organization panel is set on Friday, Mei 7 to decide whether to authorize emergency of a Chinese-made COVID-19 vaccine. The review by a WHO technical advisory group potentially paves the way for millions of doses of a Sinopharm vaccine to reach needy countries through a U.N.-backed distribution program in the coming weeks or months. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, lêer)

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