Raskin as Fed vice chair would be latest Biden pick with family connections to high-profile Democrats

The administration is reportedly eyeing Sarah Bloom Raskin, a former Fed governor and former Treasury Department official, to become the central bank’s vice chairwoman of supervision – the government’s most influential overseer of the American banking system.

Sarah Bloom Raskin is married to Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland. Her appointment to the Federal Reserve would be only the latest in a long and continuing line of Democrat familial hires.

BIDEN ADMIN SENDING ‘F— YOU’ MESSAGE WITH STRING OF FAMILY-RELATED HIRES: OBAMA ETHICS CHIEF

White House press secretary Jen Psaki, Secretary of State Antony Blinken, White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan, senior adviser Anita Dunn, White House counselor Steve Richetti, White House deputy chief of staff Bruce Reed and Presidential Personnel Office (PPO) Director Cathy Russell each have at least one direct family member working for the Biden administration.

Biden nominated Jennifer Clyburn Reed to serve as the federal chairperson of the Southeast Crescent Regional Commission (SCRC), a currently inactive commission established in 2008 that was “created to address economic distress” in the southeastern region of the U.S.

Rep. Jamie Raskin listens during a select committee meeting investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol in Washington, Oct. 19, 2021.

Rep. Jamie Raskin listens during a select committee meeting investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol in Washington, Oct. 19, 2021. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

While Reed’s father, Rep. Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., the House majority whip, does not have a hand in administration dealings, he did give a critical endorsement to Biden in the packed South Carolina Democratic primary election.

The prevalence of family-related hires in the Biden White House piqued the ire of former President Obama’s ethics chief Walter Shaub, who penned an op-ed pointing out administration officials who have family working in the administration.

“The Trump administration wasn’t the first to have these problems, but Biden’s pledge not to hire his family and his emphasis on diversity sparked hope that it would be the last,” Shaub wrote in the Washington Post in June.

“But whatever Biden meant when he promised a better way, it seems his administration now interprets that promise as narrowly applicable to his family,” he continued.

Houston Keene, Andrew Ackerman and Nick Timiraos contributed to this report.

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