Rod Blagojevich: Democratic Party I grew up in abhorred lawlessness, Rivolte

Blagojevich, 65, told Carlson he grew up on Chicago’s northwest side, which was heavily populated at the time by working-class Polish, Irish and Italian families.

Suo padre, Radislav, had immigrated from Yugoslavia and found work at the Finkl Steel Company mill. Blagojevich remarked that decades later, he held election victory gatherings at the mill in honor of his father’s hard work to give the family the opportunities they had.

“[Radislav Blagojevich] spent four years in a Nazi prisoner-of-war camp during the war for fighting on the side of the Allies, and then was in a refugee camp for three years, waiting for the chance to hopefully have the United States Congressthat one day, his youngest son would become a member ofpass a law called the Displaced Persons Act,” Egli ha detto.

That permitted my father and millions of others like him, with these long and hard-to-pronounce last names a chance to come to America, to pursue freedom and opportunity.Blagojevich’s mother, Mila, had roots in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and wife Patti.

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and wife Patti. (AP, File)

My mother and father were working people, so they wound up in Chicago, like so many people from Central and Eastern Europe,” Egli ha detto, going on to explain his father’s work at Finkl, which still produces steel today in a different part of the city.

Blagojevich, un democratico per tutta la vita, recalled the state of the city following Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination in 1968. He described the rioting that instantaneously ensued across the city, and the response from Democratic Mayor Richard J. Daley.

He recalled how Daley drew strong backlash for appearing to endorse confrontations with rioters burning and looting his city.

Daley famously rebuked Chicago Police Superintendent James Conlisk for what he saw as an insufficient response to the criminality, calling for anorder to be issued by [Conlisk] to shoot to kill any arsonist or anyone with a Molotov cocktail in his hand because they are potential murderers.

Shoot to maim or cripple anyone looting,” Daley ordered.

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Chicago mayor Richard Daley and President John F. Kennedy discuss the need for a department of urban affairs in the White House (Getty Images)

Chicago mayor Richard Daley and President John F. Kennedy discuss the need for a department of urban affairs in the White House (Getty Images)

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