Studente siberiano si arrampica su un albero per accedere a Internet per l'apprendimento remoto nel villaggio rurale

Studente siberiano si arrampica su un albero per accedere a Internet per l'apprendimento remoto nel villaggio rurale

UN russo university student living in a remote Siberian village has been climbing atop a birch tree in order to obtain internet access for online learning.

Alexei Dudoladov, 21, a student at the Omsk Institute of Water Transport, has documented his struggles on social media and, in a now-viral post, called on authorities to provide better internet service in remote regions.

“I need to go into the forest [328 yard] from the village and climb a birch tree that is [26 piedi] high… and I get on Zoom to speak to professors and prove that I am not skipping class for no reason,” he said in the TikTok and Instagram posts.

OMSK REGION, RUSSIA NOVEMBER 14, 2020: Student Alexei Dudoladov climbs a birch tree 300m away from his village of Stankevichi in order to pick up an internet signal. (Photo by Yevgeny SofiychukTASS via Getty Images)

OMSK REGION, RUSSIA NOVEMBER 14, 2020: Student Alexei Dudoladov climbs a birch tree 300m away from his village of Stankevichi in order to pick up an internet signal. (Photo by Yevgeny SofiychukTASS via Getty Images)

NYC TEACHERS STUN STUDENTS BY GIVING REMOTE LESSONS FROM HAMMOCKS, MOVING CARS

Dudoladov’s university is over 1,300 miles outside Moscow. Like many other schools in Russia, it moved to remote learning to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Omsk region’s education officials have responded, telling RBC business daily they are preparing a plan for Dudoladov that would enable him to study 170 miles outside the region’s capital.

“I was put on an individual study plan, but do they (autorità) not care about other students from other universities,” Dudoladov wrote in a Monday Instagram post.

CLICCA QUI PER OTTENERE L'APP FOX NEWS

“Why can people from the city use the internet in their apartments while villagers can only do so from highways, rooftops and trees!"

Questo articolo è apparso per la prima volta sul New York Post.

lascia un commento

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. i campi richiesti sono contrassegnati *

*