Texas school shooting: Liberal media mocks suggestion of one door entry as security measure at schools

In the wake of the mass school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, that left 21 dead, including 19 children, a fierce debate has again erupted in the United States over measures to prevent, or at least limit, such horrific tragedies. 

While liberals continue to call for gun control measures, including the banning of weapons like the AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, others have proposed ways to strengthen school security, such as limiting points of entry to one controlled spot.

The killer in Uvalde reportedly gained entry through a back door that was supposed to be locked.

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Crime scene tape surrounds Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Wednesday, May 25.

Crime scene tape surrounds Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Wednesday, May 25. (AP/Jae C. Hong)

MSNBC host Chris Hayes was one of several liberal media figures who appeared to think proponents were calling for one door total in an entire school, as opposed to one entryway but multiple exit-only doors around a campus.

“One door in and out of crowded schools. What could go wrong!?!” he asked sarcastically. In another tweet, he wrote, “Oh my god they’re gonna go with the one door thing, aren’t they?”

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The Washington Post’s Dave Weigel quipped, “Not many firefighters in Congress, huh.”

“Have the people pushing the “single entry point to school” solution ever…seen a school? Here’s my high school pls explain to me how that’s going to work,” The Bulwark’s Tim Miller wrote.

“Wouldn’t building schools with only one door create other problems? Like making it harder for kids to get out if, say, there is a fire?” The Washington Post’s Karen Tumulty asked.

HuffPost journalist Igor Bobic reported Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., portrayed the idea as a fire hazard, again seeming to think it would mean one total door in the school. 

Stephanie and Michael Chavez of San Antonio pay their respects at a makeshift memorial outside Robb Elementary School, the site of a mass shooting, in Uvalde, Texas, U.S., May 25, 2022. 

Stephanie and Michael Chavez of San Antonio pay their respects at a makeshift memorial outside Robb Elementary School, the site of a mass shooting, in Uvalde, Texas, U.S., May 25, 2022.  (REUTERS/Nuri Vallbona)

Journalists piled on Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, while fuming about the unlocked door at the school to reporters, did refer to having “one door that goes in and out of the school.”

Left-wing writer Molly Jong-Fast mocked Cruz for his anger, tweeting he had come out “bravely against doors.”

Chasten Buttigieg, the husband of Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, mocked the one-door solution as well.

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“As someone who ran lockdown drills and worked on the school safety committee, a “one door” solution is an irresponsible and egregious recommendation far removed from reality. A shooter isn’t going to stop and sign in at the front office,” he wrote.

Law enforcement work the scene after a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday, May 25.

Law enforcement work the scene after a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday, May 25. (Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images)

Conservative critics pushed back at the narrow-minded view of a potential solution to curb future mass shootings at schools like an entry control point

“A lot of schools do this,” Getting Hammered podcast host Mary Katharine Ham reacted to Miller’s tweet. “It is a sensible measure that doesn’t require an act of Congress. It does not eliminate other doors, which open from the inside but are generally inaccessible from the outside, so that visitors are funneled through a central point.”

“There’s one entrance, but there are many exits. It’s really not that hard to grasp, and it’s not that unusual, either,” National Review senior writer Charles C.W. Cooke tweeted. 

“We have a campus too and literally every building has an [entry control point], not sure why that’s hard to wrap your brain around,” Daily Caller editor-in-chief Geoffrey Ingersoll wrote. 

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