The Wounded Warrior Experience: How veterans are coping with the withdrawal from Afghanistan

He and his wife Carolyn lost not one, but two sons a year apart while General Graham was serving as a top commander in the U.S. Army. Their family’s story was told in “The Invisible Front: Loss and Love in the Era of Endless War.”

“The Army told Jeffrey he didn’t have to go because of the tragedy with experience with our son Kevin. And Jeff looked me in the eye and said, ‘Dad, I have to go,’” Gen. Graham, who spent 35 years in the Army said he understood. “Eight months later, Jeff was killed by an IED while he was on foot patrol outside of Fallujah in county Iraq.”

CONGRESS SIGNALS CONCERN OVER UPTICK IN VETERAN CRISIS HOTLINE CALLS POST-AFGHANISTAN

Their son Kevin was an ROTC Army cadet studying to be an Army doctor when depression led him to take his life. He stopped taking his medication because of the stigma associated with mental health and died by suicide. His brother Jeffrey was en route to Fort Riley to join the 1st Infantry Division to deploy to Iraq.

“So our sons died fighting different battles. Kevin died fighting the battle of the mind and Jeffrey died fighting an enemy in a faraway land,” Graham said.

Veteran in wheelchair returned from army. Close-up photo veteran in a wheelchair. Wheelchairs and legs in military uniform.

Veteran in wheelchair returned from army. Close-up photo veteran in a wheelchair. Wheelchairs and legs in military uniform.

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